Sunday, September 18, 2011

Desserts: Salted Caramel Cheesecake (Updated with A Note on Salt)



This post has gotten so much traffic via Pinerest that I have to comment further on those who say, "It's too salty." The idea is that it's a salty caramel dessert. But, everyone has a different level of salt tolerance. So, here's my suggestion--make the crust with just a little salt--a teaspoon or two. Then make the filling with just a teaspoon or two of salt. Then TASTE IT. People watch Food Network and see those people just scatter in some salt, take a small taste, and go, "Mmmm GOOD!" But that's just TV--they're supposed to say that so they don't spend precious air time adjusting the seasoning. You MUST TASTE as you go. Make the filling with everything but the eggs (raw eggs can be dangerous--I can't recommend eating anything with raw eggs in it) then TASTE it. The idea is that you taste some salt, but not that you go, "Ugh, salty." You're supposed to taste the contrast between sweet and salty. If you don't like things pretty salty, just leave the majority of the salt out and make a caramel cheesecake--caramel cheesecake is delicious too! If you taste it and it's not salty, and you want it salty, add a 1/2 teaspoon salt at a time until you get it to where you think it tastes OK. But I strongly recommend you taste as you go.


N.B. It was brought to my attention that if this recipe is made with regular salt, it is WAY too salty. I always use kosher salt. Don't use table salt or this will be truly inedible. My apologies to anyone who may have tried it already without that caveat!

Here it is at last. I’ve been trying to get a picture of a single slice of this for months. And you know what happens? That’s right—every time I’m ready to photograph it, I look for the slice I saved as my “model” and it’s gone. Someone has eaten my model. So you’re just going to have to content yourself with the picture of the whole cheesecake that I happen to have snapped once with my camera phone. It doesn’t really do it justice, but you get the idea (and yes, it’s also my profile picture).
I made this for Thanksgiving in 2010. It was proclaimed, “The best dessert you’ve ever made.” Praise, indeed. Well, actually, considering all the desserts I’ve made in 15 years of marriage, plus probably 3 years of dating, that could be saying quite a bit. In the event, I was asked to make it again for Christmas. And again for Alex’s birthday. And again for our anniversary. And every time I made it, I would post about it on Facebook, and my friends would say how much they wanted a piece. Finally, in August of this year, I made a cheesecake, and invited all my friends over for a Friday night Happy Hour and Cheesecake Devouring Event.
I could have taken numerous pictures of my friends eating it, but when the dust settled, once again, I was left with no model. In fact, I didn’t even get a piece. So the next day, I made another Salted Caramel Cheesecake. I took it to a birthday party for a friend, where once again it was completely consumed, and while I didn’t have anything left to take a picture of, at least I got a slice of it this time.
So, rather than make you wait until November for this recipe, when I might actually be able to get a decent picture of it, I’m giving it to you now and you can make it for Thanksgiving and Christmas and your husband’s birthday and your anniversary. I hope it’s the best dessert you’ll ever make.

Salted Caramel Cheesecake
Serves 2
Ha ha! Just kidding—I’ve served up to 20 people with one cheesecake. Ideally it probably serves about 10-12 people.

For the crust

About 15 graham crackers
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 stick unsalted butter, melted
1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt (note: I reduced this from 2 teaspoons. A number of folks in the comments said they found it was too salty. I made this recipe 4 times before posting this, and checked the measurements pretty carefully, I thought. However, I made it for Thanksgiving 2011 and realized that they WAY the crust is distributed in the pan can make it seem quite salty--if there's a significant slope between the bottom and the sides, that fairly dense piece of crust can be overpowering to the rest of the recipe. So I'm recommending the reduction to the salt to account for the possible variations in the way people make the crust.)
1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a food processor, grind graham crackers to crumbs. (If you’re using premade crumbs, you want about 8 oz or 2 cups, and you’ll want to do all these steps in a bowl.) Add sugar and salt and pulse to combine. With motor running, add butter through feed tube. Process for another few seconds until combined.
2. Transfer the mixture to a 9” or 10” (I have a 10” myself) springform pan sprayed with cooking spray. Pat crumb mixture into the bottom of the pan, and up the sides about 2”. Don’t worry if it’s not perfectly even around the top; you just want to be sure it’s deep enough to hold all the cheesecake mixture.
3. Bake crust until slightly brown. You’ll just be able to smell it. This will take anywhere from 10-12 minutes. Remove crust from the oven and allow to cool on a rack. Reduce oven temperature to 300 degrees F.
For the cheesecake

3 8oz packages cream cheese, at room temperature
1 13-14 oz. can dulce de leche
2 tablespoons all purpose flour
3 teaspoons kosher salt
1 ¼ cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
4 large eggs, at room temperature

1. In a stand mixture fitted with the paddle attachment beat cream cheese until smooth, add dulce de leche and beat to combine.
2. Add flour and salt, beat to combine, stopping to scrape down the sides as necessary. Beat until smooth and fluffy, about 5 minutes. There should be no lumps.
3. Add the sugar and beat to combine.
4. Add the vanilla, and then beat in the eggs one at a time until just combined, about 30 seconds each. Don’t overbeat once the eggs are added; the cheesecake will puff up too much while baking, and the top will crack.
5. Pour the cream cheese mixture into the cooled crust and smooth the top.
6. Bake at 300 degrees F for 55 – 65 minutes. The center will seem to be only slightly set, and will be wobbly if you nudge it. The sides will puff slightly.
7. Cool completely on a rack, then cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight (I have gotten away with a 5 hour cooling, but I was on edge that it wouldn’t turn out; overnight is really best). When I put it in the refrigerator to set up, I remove the ring from my springform, and put the cheesecake on a cake stand. You can leave it in the springform if you don't have a cake stand.
For the caramel

½ cup granulated sugar
3 tablespoons water
½ cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1. In a large saucepan over medium heat, combine the sugar and water. Swirl to combine. All those warnings about stirring caramel and brushing down the sides of the pan with a wet pastry brush to avoid crystal formation? I avoid all that by just never stirring it at all. If I need to move it around the pan, I just swirl it.
2. Continue cooking until the sugar turns golden brown, swirling occasionally. You’re looking for something that’s about the color of dark honey. The problem with caramel is that it goes from perfect to burnt in the blink of an eye, so just when you find yourself thinking, “Any second now…” pull it off the heat. It should take 3-5 minutes.
3. Off the heat, carefully add the butter, then the cream. Don’t wait until the butter is melted; toss in the butter, give it a whisk, then pour in the cream. It will foam up, seize, and otherwise look like a total failure. Persevere! Add the vanilla extract and salt and continue whisking.
4. Return to medium low heat and whisk until smooth. (Added note: if your caramel is too thin, let it cook for awhile over a low heat. I've actually let it boil a bit--unintentionally--and just when I thought I'd ruined it, it turned out to be perfect.) Allow to cool slightly, about 15 minutes.
5. Remove cheesecake from the refrigerator and pour caramel over the top. I try to encourage mine to pool in the middle, but if you’re more of a drip-down-the-sides type, you can go with that. I just think the drippy makes sort of a mess on my cake stand, but maybe that doesn’t bother you.
6. Return the cheesecake to the refrigerator to let the caramel set, about 30 minutes. To serve, cut in slices (it’s pretty rich) with a sharp knife, wiping the blade clean after every slice.


159 comments:

Anonymous said...

Can you make a simpler, Vania-friendly version of it?

TD said...

Well, ahem, "Anonymous," I can try ;) How much simpler do you want it? You're still going to have to mix cream cheese, eggs, sugar, and dulce de leche and put it on top of a graham cracker crust. What if it was like brownies, and the topping was a jar of caramel? Would that be simple enough? I can work on that this weekend.

Anonymous said...

LOL simple as in I don't need to go to Williams Sonoma to get a bunch of new equipments to fill my already-cluttered shoebox of an apartment.

I hope you start posting more stuff now that you've resurrected your blog! :)

TD said...

I'll see what I can do for you :)

Yup, I'm going to try to post once a week from now on. Trying to decide what I should make tomorrow for next week's post!

Heather said...

Is the salt for all 3 parts kosher salt?

Charity O said...

Just curious... how large of a can of dulce de leche?

Cori said...

For the can of dulce de leche, do you buy a specific brand/size or do you make your own from a can of sweetend condensed milk?

Eco said...

What size jar of dulce de leche? This look yummy!

JulieAnn said...

This looks so yummy. How many oz. was your can of dulce de leche? I think there are a couple of sizes at the store near me.

Anonymous said...

I would like to attempt this for Thanksgiving, however, want to make sure I get the salt situation right =) By kosher salt, are you also referring to course ground (bigger chunks)? Because I have kosher salt both fine ground and course. Im assuming you mean course. Please let me know before I butcher this beautiful cheesecake! Thanks for the awesome recipe!

Anonymous said...

Looks delish!!! Where can I buy Dulce de Leche, and how much should I buy??

Anonymous said...

I'm planning on making this for my husband's birthday - sounds right up his proverbial ally! :) Just wondering though if you mean to use kosher salt only in the caramel, in the cheesecake as well, or perhaps in the crust too? Can you clarify where you mean table salt and where you mean kosher salt? Thank you so much for sharing your recipe!

Carrie Clayden said...

I already know it's going to blow my mind, thank you for sharing, this will probably be in high demand!

Ryan and Ashley said...

Can you show me a link of what a can of dulce de leche is? Is it sweetened condensed milk? Or is it something else?

Ryan and Ashley said...

Can you show me a link to what your dulce de leche is? Is it sweetened condensed milk?

Anonymous said...

Do you use a waterbath?

Anonymous said...

My husband is obsessed with dulce de leche (especially when combined with white chocolate) so I cannot wait to make this! Thanks for posting!

Monica C said...

How many ounces is your dulce de leche?

Monica C said...

How many ounces is your dulce de leche?

Melissa Pattee said...

you say "one can of dulce de leche"
what size can? i am making the dulce de leche at home so i guess i need a measurement :)

cook dan said...

Looks good, and I have heard of this before. Never tried dulce de leche in chz cake before. Think ill make two tomorrow

Anonymous said...

So, kosher salt in the the cheesecake and the caramel?

Anonymous said...

How much is in one can of dulce de leche? Where I live, there isn't a standard size.

Karen said...

Where do I find a can of the dulce de leche? i looked and couldn't find it so ended up buying sweetened condensed milk. can i use that?

TD said...

OK so to address everyone who is asking about dulce de leche--I buy it in the "latin foods" section of the grocery store. And that's in my local Super Wal Mart. If you're buying it by the can, I think it's a 14 oz can. Also, you can buy it on Amazon in a 6 or 8 pack.

Now, if you simply can't find it and don't want to order it, you can make it yourself. Take 1 can of sweetened condendensed milk (the 14 oz size), pop a couple of holes in it with a churchkey (the pointy single-hole style can opener) and put it in a water bath with the water almost to the top of the can. Bring the water to a simmer and keep it there for about four hours. You'll have to watch it and top up the water as it boils away. The longer you let it cook (and you can't really overcook it) the more caramely and rich it will be.

The salt in all three parts is kosher salt. DON'T USE TABLE SALT.

I don't use a water bath when cooking the cheesecake--just goes right in the oven. :)

Here's a link to Amazon--this is the brand of dulce de leche that my grocery store carries.

http://www.amazon.com/Lechera-Sweetened-Condensed-Milk-14-Ounce/dp/B004DI8E44/ref=sr_1_3?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1321987690&sr=1-3

I hope everyone enjoys this!!

TD said...

Correction, this is the link to the dulce de leche--the other is sweetened condensed milk made by the same company.

http://www.amazon.com/Lechera-Dulce-Leche-13-4-Ounce-Container/dp/B001EPPBMW/ref=sr_1_1?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1321991192&sr=1-1

Lesley T said...

Do you have any recommendations on making these into individual servings? Like cupcakes?

TD said...

I haven't tried making this particular recipe into cupcakes or smaller servings. I would assume you could, but it would change the cooking time. Also, it would make a LOT. I'm not sure how you would cook the crust unless you had mini springform pans. If you used muffin tins, the crust would get stuck in the bottom.

I did a recipe some time back for a crustless cheesecake that you served with graham crackers on the side. Maybe try these and swap out some of the cream cheese with the dulce de leche (or just add in a 1/4 cup). If you make the graham crackers, up the salt by a teaspoon or so.

http://themodernapron.blogspot.com/2009/03/teeter-totter.html

Let me know if you try it!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for the clarification on the dulche de leche amount. I've done the crust, made the cheesecake and it's in the fridge. Will do the caramel tomorrow. Excited to try this for the first time on Thanksgiving. Thank you!

TD said...

Re: the caramel--I have had friends email me about it. Caramel can be really hard. The tricks I've found are swirl, swirl, swirl, and watch, watch, watch. Don't stir, and don't leave it alone. It should be a lovely golden...caramel color. I hope it works out for you, and I hope it's AWESOME. :)

Anonymous said...

Thank you for this recipe! I made the cheesecake last night and the caramel this morning. Everything looks amazing. I'm so excited to share this with my family later today for Thanksgiving!

Annie said...

I made this last night and to the person not wanting to buy a lot of equipment I used a gal ziplock and rolling pin for crust. Worked great. The caramel looked like a disaster but turned out like u said. I only doubted you a minute or two. I think next time I'll cut the salt in half. It's so delicious and perfect but a tad salty. Thank u for the star recipe this thanksgiving!

TD said...

Annie - so glad it turned out!! I like salt a lot, so if it was too salty for you, cut the salt in the crust by 1/2t and in the center by 1t. Caramel is hard--yay that it worked! I've had to make it 2 and 3 times over to get it right. Happy Thanksgiving!!

Kristen Kane said...

Did anyone else have trouble with the caramel sauce? I couldn't get the sugar and water to turn to the dark honey color. My first try never turned brown, but crystalized. So the second time I tried it I just took it off the heat after boiling it for 5 minutes. Any suggestions?

Leaning on Grace said...

Thanks for this recipe! I made it for Thanksgiving and thought I would tell my thoughts. First, I read you comments about table salt vs kosher when I decided to make it, but I printed the recipe and then forgot about the change. So, needless to say, even though I cut down the salt, it was "inedible" as you said! The crust was the worst...thinking that maybe with the salt in the cheesecake and on top, that the crust might not even need salt. But another problem I had...I baked it for 65 min and thought it was "wobbly when nudged" but when we cut into it today, it was not set. Any suggestions? I would like to give it another try!

I made the caramel but it just didn't turn out for me. I guess I didn't let it get brown enough. So, I ended up giving up on that and made this quick salted caramel. I have no idea how it compares taste wise, but everyone loved the topping! http://www.yourhomebasedmom.com/caramel-saucesalted-caramel-sauce/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%253A+LeighAnneWilkes+%2528Your+Homebased+Mom%2529&utm_content=Google+Reader Looking forward to giving this another try sometime soon!

TD said...

Caramel sauce is HARD, I'm the first to admit that. I find it very hit or miss, myself. For the crystalization problem, I get around that by never, ever stirring it. Just swirl it. As for the timing, depending on your stove (gas vs electric) and the heat of your burner (there's a pretty broad range in the term "medium heat") it may take longer to get the right color. There have been times I've made this recipe that I've had to make the caramel 3 times before it worked. Another factor is the pan you use--I have a 3qt All Clad that I use, but if your pan is bigger/smaller/lighter/heavier, that's going to impact the rate at which the sugar cooks.

For the problem of the center not being set, you could try increasing your oven temp by 25 degrees. It may be that your oven temperature isn't quite accurate. You can always leave it in longer, but it may just be easier to up the temperature slightly. Also I'm assuming you refrigerated it--if not, by all means, don't skip that step. Chilling it is a big part of the setting up process.

Hope that helps!

Lesley said...

This looks so delicious in the picture and the recipe seemed simple enough. I made it exactly like your recipe said and omg...waaaay too salty!!!! I would cut way back on the salt next time! I used coarse kosher salt for all of the salt and it was terribly salty!!! Inedible, but beautiful on the cake stand. Warning to all....cut the salt in half!

TD said...

Lesley - so sorry it was too salty for you! I make it for my husband (who normally complains that I oversalt things) and he has no problem with it. Salt is such a personal thing, I think--some people's palates can't handle much, some can handle much more. Perhaps I should add a recommendation to folks to taste along the way--use just half the salt in the crust, taste before pressing it into the springform, and if it seems not salty enough, add a bit more. Same with the filling.

Anyone else have problems with it being too salty? I have to make it again tomorrow, so I'll make sure I'm using the amounts I call for here, and that there are no typos.

Heather said...

I made it yesterday for Thanksgiving and it was such a hit! Probably the best dessert I've ever made. My caramel didn't turn out (runny), but it was still fabulous. I actually used regular salt, about 1/3 of the amount called for in the recipe in each step, and it turned out just right. This recipe is definitely a keeper!

TD said...

Oh Heather I am so glad to hear that! I was getting a bit disheartened because it seemed like maybe it was just too salty, but I've always loved it. And it sounds like it was too much salt for some folks, for which I am sorry--I know the disappointment of making something on a lark for a special occasion, and having it not live up. Also good to know about the reduction for using table salt. Glad it was a success for you, and I hope you enjoy it for many years to come. I HEART this dessert! :)

Kristin said...

It didn't work for me, either, unfortunately. The problem was actually in the caramel sauce - the kosher salt didn't quite dissolve. I think I will try it again in the future, but make a much sweeter version. I was so thankful for your careful explanations for each step, though!

TD said...

Having just eaten it again, literally a few minutes ago, I think the way the crust is distributed can impact the saltiness. As for the caramel, I haven't ever had a problem with the salt dissovling, but tonight I did have to cook it for quite a long time to get it to the right consisistency. That, I think, has a lot to do with the level of the heat. "Medium" heat has a pretty wide definition. I'll update this recipe with some comments.

Susie said...

I made this for Thanksgiving dinner, it's a beautiful dessert... I used coarse seasalt that came with a little grinder, I ground it before measuring... I don't know if maybe that was wrong, but it was pretty salty. Of course I just kept eating it anyway,,,, now I can't stay out of it. I think next time I will cut down the salt amount and it will be perfect !

Phyllis@Around the House said...

wow that looks delicious...sea salt or course grain or kosher...never table salt...another super tip...sprinkle the top with sea salt flakes ...wow you will be delighted...the flakes stay in tact and does not desolve like table salt...give it a try...yhanks ..I'll let you know how it turns out...try martha stewarts salted caramel 6 layer chocolate cake...to die for...phyllis

amesina said...

I made this last night. Using kosher salt. and it was too salty. Not just the crust - each layer was too salty. Im feeling like salt in ONE of the three layers would give you the contrast that you are looking for (sweet/salty) without having salt totally overwhelm the dish. My husband took one bite and made a face. He said - is this supposed to be sweet or salty?!?! I would make this again but with about a quarter of the salt!

Tracy said...

So, to be clear, this will taste somewhat salty. That's the idea. If you cut the salt back to a teaspoon in the crust and one in the filling, you will be making a Caramel Cheesecake. Not everyone likes things where the salt is a prominent flavor, or the sweet/salty combination. And as a Caramel Cheesecake, this is also delicious. But if you want the salted caramel experience, you have to up the salt a bit. My recommendation is to taste the crust before you cook it, as that's where the salt flavor is most prominent after it's done. Enjoy!

Ally said...

Incredible sounding cheesecake! I love salted caramel.
xo
http://allykayler.blogspot.com/

Caroline said...

I found the crust and the caramel sauce wayyyy to salty. I would reduce to 1/2 teaspoon maybe a little more. The cheesecake was delicious though!

Anonymous said...

I made it I just didn't add as much salt and didn't even add the sugar to the cheesecake the delch de leche added enough sweetness it was FABULOUS !!!! Thanks !!!!

Tracy said...

Glad you enjoyed it!!

Jen said...

I had a lot of difficulty with the caramel sauce to so I went with this recipe instead which uses a candy thermometer and corn syrup http://savorysweetlife.com/2009/11/simple-yet-glorious-caramel-sauce-recipe/

Tracy said...

There have been times I've had to make the caramel sauce 3 times to get it right. It's tricky, I know. I don't have a candy thermometer, which is the reason I don't give those temps. Happy holidays!

Monkey Meanderings said...

Thank you!!!! Made this for Christmas - I did reduce the salt in each step by about 1/4 and it turned out perfect! My Mom said this is the best thing dessert I have EVER made :) Could not have done it without the great steps to the caramel and a few prayers to the caramel gods didn't hurt either :)

Tracy said...

Prayers to the caramel gods never hurt! They're finicky!:) SO SO glad it turned out for you, and that it was well received!!!

Happy holidays!

Michele Tillotson said...

I made this exactly as the recipe stated, and I'm afraid mine was inedibly salty. And I love salt! I'm not quitting though. I will cut the salt in half and try this again next week. And I think I'm going to leave the salt out of the batter altogether — just halving it in the crust and caramel. I will say, each individual part of the cheesecake was wonderful, but altogether it was simply inedible. The salted caramel was DIVINE. Thanks for the recipe!

Tracy said...

SO sorry it was too salty for you! I tested this 5 times before I posted it, and I've had good luck with it, but thanks for not giving up! Enjoy!!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for this recipe!

I just wanted to tell you that I made this for Thanksgiving last month (with the original recipe -- using Kosher salt!) and it was the definite favorite of all the desserts. I'm a salt lover and really enjoyed the recipe, but I could definitely see where people who are not as salt loving as me might find it a little too salty. I think the caramel was PERFECT in terms of salt. If anyone has ever had Jeni's Salty Caramel Ice Cream (http://www.jenisicecreams.com/products/Salty-Caramel-Pint.html) it very much reminds me of that flavor. And if you haven't had Jeni's.... it's worth the shipping if you're not from Ohio! ;-)

Anyway, I was asked to bring this cheesecake to a New Year's dinner and am in the process of making it for the second time. I decided to use the newer amount of salt for the crust (1 1/4 tsp). I'm going to keep the caramel as is. And for the filling, I decided on 1 heaping teaspoon of salt. This IS a recipe for Salted Caramel Cheesecake so I don't want to eliminate the nice salty flavor! But I hope that reducing the salt in the cheesecake filling will be just right for anyone's taste.

I also wanted to add that I had never made caramel before trying this recipe and it turned out perfectly. I think the note that said, "The problem with caramel is that it goes from perfect to burnt in the blink of an eye, so just when you find yourself thinking, 'Any second now…' pull it off the heat," REALLY saved me! I was staring at the sauce thinking I should leave it a little longer because I wasn't quite sure if it was done, but then I thought of that line in the directions and pulled it off the burner. Didn't have a single problem! Thanks!

Tracy said...

YAY! That delights me to hear! Thank you for sharing your experience! So glad it worked for you, and I hope it's just as big a hit for NYE. Would be interested to hear how you think the reduced salt in the crust compares to the original. Enjoy, and Happy New Year!

Anonymous said...

Update!

Using only 1 heaping teaspoon of kosher salt in the filling worked out great! Everyone loved it. You could taste all the flavors without the salt being too overpowering. And you still get a nice "salty" flavor with the caramel. So if anyone thought it was too salty, try the 1 tsp for the filling! :)

Thanks again for an amazing recipe!

Tracy said...

Fantastic! Thanks for the feedback!

E said...

Made this tonight and the proportions were WAY too much. Used a deep dish pan and the cheesecake is ready to take out, but it looks like the Attack of the Goo is trying to take over the pan and eat my oven. Due to this, the surface cracked also :(
I followed your measurements exactly...*sad*

Heather said...

I made this again last week and my surface cracked, but I think it was because I left it in the oven too long (it was still delicious!). And my caramel actually worked this time! Yay! Every one who has tried this dessert has absolutely loved it. I'm already looking forward to the next time I make it.

Tracy said...

E - I am sorry it didn't work. I don't have an explanation for that. I might ask how big a deep dish pan you used--if it's only 8" then I would suspect that, yes, that would be too much filling. I use a 9" or a 10" and it's pretty full.

Heather - So glad it worked out for you! I love it, myself :)

alleycat101 said...

i LOVE how you explain recipes!! cANt wAIt to try this this weekend. I'm making for the superbowl. :) my husband loves cheesecake and we're Argentinean so of course LOVE dulce de leche...so excited for the combo!!!

Tracy said...

alleycat101 - I hope you love it! My friend whose mom is from Argentina told me how to make dulce de leche (if I wasn't going to buy it, which I usually do), and was the one who said to pop the top on the can a little so it wouldn't explode. Her mom had a can explode once and she says there's still sweetened condensed milk on the ceiling! Enjoy!!

alleycat101 said...

that's hilarious!! my grandmother actually makes it from scratch...can't say i've tried THAT yet...but if I do... :)

Tracy said...

If you do, use a church key to make a small hole in the top of the can! Otherwise you too will have sweetened condensed milk on your ceiling for 35 years! :)

alleycat101 said...

i meant from SCRATCH scratch...not with the sweet condensed milk way. i've made it with sweet condensed milk before but not my grandmother's way. i've been wanting to try - i have an uncle who says hers is better than anything jarred...haha

alleycat101 said...

ok. I'm a little nervous! just pulled the cheesecake out and it ALMOST overflowed. didn't but it looks quite puffed and definitely wobbly...do you think it will set ok? it was in for awhile. the eggs i get are ENORMOUS so i wonder if that made a lot more batter??? we'll see. crossing my fingers...

Tracy said...

So egg size CAN make a difference, since they are a form of leavening. However, if you chill it, it should sit down and set up. The chilling process causes it to compact. Even if it's a bit airy. it should still be tasty. Just call it Salted Caramel Mousse Cheesecake!

alleycat101 said...

haha good one! actually before i even put it in the fridge it started to take a beautiful shape :) and it smells DELICIOUS!! making the caramel now...

Tracy said...

Yay! I hope it turns out beautifully!

Anonymous said...

For those who think this is too salty, are you using salted butter or unsalted butter? That can make a difference, too...just FYI.

Anonymous said...

My caramel sauce never did turn color of honey and I followed her directions step by step. It tasted good, so I just added a wrapped Brach's caramel piece and let it melt in the sauce and it was just fine!

Jocelyn said...

Is it possible to make the cheesecake filling without an electic mixer with a paddle attachment? I'm dying to give this a try, but don't have a mixer.

Tracy said...

I would say yes, it is. If you have a hand mixer, that would work. If you don't have any kind of a mixer, it is possible to beat everything together by hand. I would just encourage you (for the sake of your arms) to make sure the cream cheese is completely at room temperature (leave it out overnight, even), and beat the eggs before adding them to the mixture. It will take a bit more effort than making it with any type of a mixer, but it can be done. Good luck!

Anonymous said...

I am in the process of baking this now and can't wait to try it as I love salted caramels. For those having issues with cracking while baking, try this... Bake at 350 for 15 minutes, then drop the temp to 200 for 1 hour and 10 minutes, or until the cheesecake giggles like jello when you tap the pan. No fail technique for me and I owned a cheesecake company in my previous life! Works on any flavor...slow bake, low temp.

Tracy said...

Thanks for the tip! That, combined with not overbeating the eggs (thus incorporating as little air as possible into the mix that can expand as it heats) should keep it from cracking. I've never had a problem with cracking, but I know others do, so great advice from someone who has clearly made their fair share of cheesecakes! :)

Jocelyn said...

I just made my dulche de leche in preperation for making this cheesecake for Easter dinner. I did it in the oven (because I was too chicken to try in a pot of boiling water) and it turned out perfectly. Just in case anyone is interested, you pour your sweetened condensed milk into an oven safe dish and cover tightly with foil. Then place that dish into a larger ovensafe pan and fill it with hot water about 3/4 of the way up the dish containing the condensed milk. Then cook in a preheated oven (425 degrees) for 60-90 minutes, checking on the water level every half hour or so and adding more as needed.

I hope that helps someone!

Jocelyn said...

And if anyone else is having a problem with the crust, bear in mind that some graham crackers are a lot smaller than others, LOL. I was wondering why my 'crust' was so runny. In the end I made the crumbs and measured out two cups worth and it's perfect.

Jocelyn said...

Just made my caramel. SQUEEEE! I'm so excited :D

Tracy said...

Jocelyn, I've never tried making dulce de leche that way--glad it worked for you, and good idea for others in the future. I've always done the can-in-boiling-water method (or the buy-it-at-the-store method). For graham crackers, for others' reference, I have always used Nabisco Honey Maid (purchased at Costco in bulk), but thanks for the note that other brands may be a different size--hadn't thought of that. And yes, there's something OH SO TRIUMPHANT about a caramel sauce that works. It is a moment to squee! I agree!

Sara D. said...

Hello, I'm planning to make this for a dinner party this week. I feel a little nervous about the caramel... not sure I'm up for trying it this time. Do you think I could top it with some caramel sauce like you would put on ice cream? maybe add a bit of salt to it?
thanks for your help - I've had this saved for a long time, just waiting for the right moment to make it!

Tracy said...

Sara - you can totally used jarred caramel. I would suggest you get something that's fairly thick to start with (Smucker's is a little thin--slosh the jar a bit in the store and see how slowly it moves from side to side). It will thicken up as it chills, but if you're worried it won't, leave the cheesecake plain and drizzle each slice artistically with caramel and scatter it with a pinch of fleur de sel just before serving. You could also trying making your own caramel and having the jar as a backup in the event of failure.

Also, salt--I would recommend for a first pass at this recipe (based on the feedback I've gotten that some love it, and some find it too darned salty) to reduce it a bit. If you decide it's not quite salty enough, you can always add more the next time you make it (or even scatter each piece with fleur de sel if you taste if before serving and think it's not salty enough), but I would be so sorry to hear that your guests found it inedible because it was just too salty for them!

I hope it turns out wonderfully! Enjoy!

Emma Green said...

Thank you for this recipe! I can not wait to try it out. It looks amazing!!

Tracy said...

I hope you enjoy it!!

Anonymous said...

How is Kosher salt different than regular salt? Kosher simply means it is blessed by a rabbai and doesn't affect the taste!!!

Tracy said...

Ah, not true. Buy a box of kosher salt, and look at the grains as compared to table salt. They are much larger than table salt. Kosher salt takes its name from the process it was most frequently used in--making meat kosher. If you were to add the same amount of kosher salt and table salt to a recipe, you would find the table salt recipe to be far saltier, as the grains are far finer. A teaspoon of kosher salt and a teaspoon of table salt are not the same thing at all. Use kosher salt in this recipe or it will be WAY too salty.

Anonymous said...

Could you re-write the recipe with the new changes? Its so confusing...you dont put the size of dulce de leche and make it CLEAR you are using kosher salt. Thanks!

Anonymous said...

Ugh! I was looking forward to this so much. But alas, even with the salt adjusted, it was WAY WAY too salty. I made it exactly as the recipe, but it was really salty. What a bummer! I think I'll take the salt down a few notches in the crust, cheesecake, and sauce and see what happens. Extremely salty and a huge disappointment.

Tracy said...

So sorry--I know that disappointment (not with this, but with other things I was looking forward to that didn't live up to my expectations). I've been trying to think of some kind of a "scale" that I could offer--something that pretty much everyone eats or makes, and using it for comparison. E.g. McDonald's french fries--do you salt them? I do. If you don't, you might want to scale the salt back in this. The problem is, not everyone eats McDonald's french fries (I haven't in years, but I did, and when I did, I salted). But I can't find a universal food. Working on it, though. And when I find it, then I can recommend a target salt level for everyone. It might just be, taste x amount of kosher salt, and if it's bitter, cut it back. But I'm not sure how much that x amount is. Hmm, that might work...I'll keep thinking about that. Again, sorry you were disappointed, but do try it again with your salt level--I think you'll still like the flavor.

Mylynka said...

YAY! This looks amazing and is something my husband will love! Salted caramel anything is his favorite! I am looking forward to making this!

Rachel said...

I'm making this for the second time now; it's a huge hit for girls' night! I like to salt only the caramel layer; that may be a good compromise for those who don't want it overly salty.

Tracy said...

Rachel, I think that's an awesome compromise. In fact, for those who were worried it would be too salty, my suggestion is to cut the salt down to 1/3 of the original, and sprinkle each serving with Fleur de Sel to add the salty. Hope it's good!

Shautel Walker said...

Is there any particular reason you didn't use a water bath?

Tracy said...

You don't really need one. I've never had a problem with this cracking excessively. I think the last time I made it, there was a small crack, and it became "invisible" as it settled.

One of the reasons the instructions caution you about how much you beat after adding the eggs is that if you incorporate air into the batter, that air will expand in the heat of the oven, and cause cracks.

A water bath prevents that by slowing the rate at which the mixture can heat (limited by the fact that water can't be more than 212F). However, if you don't beat in much air, you won't have any significant cracking, and therefore no need for a water bath.

You can use one if you feel more comfortable doing so, by all means, but it may change the cooking time, making it longer.

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sandi said...

Should I use salted, or unsalted butter for the caramel? Thank you in advance!

Joey barrett said...
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Joey barrett said...

I made this tonight, I did half the salt for everything that needed it and it turned out AMAZING. It is super rich and decadant. It took me 3 tries to get the caramel just right. I realized that most of you are probably making the same mistake I did. LET THE WATER SUGAR MIXTURE BOIL! Let it boil until you get the dark honey color.

Also, keep in mind that you are better off using LESS salt than the actual recipe because at the end if needed you can just sprinkle it on top! That way the whole thing is not ruined. I wish I could upload a photo because you all would be in heaven!

Thanks so much to everyones comments and tips and the person who came up with this recipe. It is so good and will for sure be my holiday desert!

Tracy said...

Sandi - I actually use salted butter because it's what I have on hand. If you're afraid the salt in the butter will make the caramel overly salty, then by all means, use unsalted.

Joey - So glad you liked it. I agree that if you're concerned about the salt level that the thing to do is reduce it down and then scatter fleur de sel or something over it at the end. The caramel is tricky and you're right--just let it go. And I never stir it, even at the beginning, because then you don't have that pesky worry about crystalization and use a brush and water to wash down the sides of the pan. If you never stir it, you don't have to wash down the sides, has been my experience. Enjoy!!

Anonymous said...

I made this for fourth of July and I just want to say that this was waaay too salty! And yes, as author instructed, I used Kosher salt. It was almost inedible! I tasted it and realized how salty the caramel was, and told everyone to just scrap it off. But even the cheesecake was too salty. :-( Very disappointing bc it took me a while to make. Beware

Tracy said...

I would urge people to taste it as they go. Taste the crust with a little salt in it. If that's OK, add a little more. Same with the filling. I personally have no qualms about tasting things with raw egg in them, but I know some people do, so my suggestion is to put the salt in before you put the eggs in, and taste, taste, taste. When you add the eggs it may make it slightly less salty, but not significantly so. Taste the filling with everything but the eggs and see what you think, and add salt slowly.

Sorry you were disappointed--I am very sensitive to the fact that this is a dessert that is usually being made for an occasion, and I feel bad when people say it didn't work for them. Salt is just a very personal seasoning.

Anonymous said...

I don't cook, but I love to bake and cheesecakes are my favorite. I'm a caramel lover so I was really looking forward to this. I was able to fine the canned dulce de leche, although I may try to make my own next time just to see how it works. I didn't have any issues with the salt, but I took to heart your comments about the distribution of the crust. I thought the cheesecake was VERY sweet, VERY rich. I never could get the caramel topping to come out. I tried lower heat, higher heat, smaller sauce pan, larger sauce pan. I tried 5 or 6 times. I finally gave up and searched the internet for a different caramel recipe. Didn't really like that one either, but used it anyway. The cake got great reviews and I'll try it again since I bought two cans of dulce de leche and I would really like to figure out the caramel topping. Thanks for the addition to my recipe files.

Tracy said...

I myself have had problems with the caramel. When I first started making it, it would turn out maybe 20% of the time. Now (15 years later) I've reversed that and it only fails about 20% of the time. I keep a jar of something like Mrs. Richardson's (which is nice and thick) on hand, just in case. You can always not top the cake, cut it, and drizzle jarred caramel over it (you might want to scatter it with a little fleur de sel, too). Glad you enjoyed the cake!

Patricia Martin said...

I made this today and went ahead and served it tonight. It smelled so good we couldn't wait! Even without the overnight set, it was set well and was delicious! My oldest son exclaimed that he would be taking this recipe with him when he moves out (in 10 years or so). It was a crowd pleaser all around. Even my husband who is a very particular guy, went on and on about the deliciousness. Thank you for the fabulous recipe.

Tracy said...

I am so delighted you enjoyed it. Thanks for letting me know!

Summer Holeman said...

I made this using the kosher salt recommendation. It was so salty we had to toss it, very disappointing.

Tracy said...

I recommend making the filling with minimal salt all the way up to adding the eggs, and before you add the eggs, taste it. If you don't taste it, you won't know if it's salty enough/not too salty for you.

Anonymous said...

I make this over and over again! Always a big hit. I taste as I go.
Thanks so much for this wonderful treat!

Leslie said...

On your graham cracker count for the curst...when you say about 15...is that the whole big long rectangle that you count as one?

Tracy said...

Leslie - Yes, one whole rectangle from a box of something like Honey Maid graham crackers. The big rectangle that's scored to break into four smaller rectangles.

Anonymous said...

You can make mini cheesecakes by putting a Nilla wafer in the bottom of a mini cupcake paper and fill with cheesecake batter

Danielle said...

I just put my cheesecake in the fridge, making for a dinner party tomorrow. I need to leave early in te morning to help my sister cook the dinner (Canadian Thanksgiving) so I won't be able to make caramel tomorrow. Is it alright to let the caramel set over night in the fridge after i pour it ontop? Also, I only had coarse kosher salt or regular table so I thought using less table salt would be better than coarse kosher. I tasted it along the way in each step(couldn't help myself) but now after reading the SALTY reviews I'm worried to even add salt to my caramel sauce atall. I will be meeting a lot of people or the first time tomorro night and I don't want them to think I suck at baking lol, what would you suggest?

Anonymous said...

Just coming across this fantastic looking recipe. My question is can you put the caramel on the cake and leave it in the frigde overnight? Also have you ever thought or tried to do it with a chocolate crust instead?

Tracy said...

Danielle (and Anonymous) yes you can refrigerate it with the caramel on top (sorry for the delay in the response--I know Candian Txgiving was Monday!).

Anonymous - I've never tried chocolate, but try it and let me know how it is!

Danielle, for the salt issue, yes, leave it out of the caramel if you like. If you taste it and it's not salty enough, add a scattering of fleur de sel over the top as you serve each piece. Or even serve a little bowl of fleur de sel with it and let people salt their own.

Hope it turned out for you!

jemiro said...

Hi Tracey, don't bother about the picture being taken from your mobile phone, it looks PERFECT like from a magazine!
One question: Why is refrigerating so important? Only for the taste or necessary for the substance to 'hold'? Thanks, from Germany

Tracy said...

Jemiro - The refrigeration is both for the filling to firm up, and for the caramel to set. As it chills, the filling settles and becomes a bit more dense, giving it that super creamy cheesecake texture. The caramel doesn't necessarily have to be chilled, although it may have a more "saucy" consistency, but that would be OK too! Enjoy!!

Anonymous said...

I made this dessert yesterday. Caramel sauce recipe is amazing. I want to roll around in it! I also wanted to respond to some of the concerns about salt. Because there was a concern raised here, I just halved the salt content called for in the recipe, and the result is a lovely salty,sweet flavor that comes with fleur de sel caramels. The salt is not overpowering -- it enhances the sweet throughout. Thanks for posting such a terrific recipe -- and the sauce will be part of my toolbox for years to come I'm sure!

Anonymous said...

For those of you who want to make mini cheesecakes, I have these suggestions: I have a recipe that uses 8 oz of cream cheese and one egg, and it makes about 18 mini cupcake sized cheesecakes. To prevent the sticking to the pan thing, I do one of two things - either use mini cupcake liners (easy to find at the grocery store) or use use circles cut of parchment paper (or waxed paper) to fit the bottom (I cut a big piece of paper, accordin it, trace the bottom and them cut out a bunch at a time) If you use cupcake liners, there's no problem getting them out, but if you use the paper method, let them cool just a bit (I'd guess about 5-8 minutes) and them gently ease them out with a fork or a knife.

Tracy said...

Thanks Anonymous #2 for the tip on the minis. And for Anonymous #1, so glad you liked it, and that you were able to adjust the salt. I love salt (as in, I can eat it straight--not in huge quantities, but I can lick it off my finger with no problem) but some people are more sensitive to it than I am, so I'm glad cutting it worked for you. Enjoy!

Sidney Cook said...

Making this for my birthday! So excited :)

Tracy said...

Great! Let me know how it turns out! Be sure you taste, taste, taste as you go along. Add the salt a little at a time and taste and add more if it suits you. ENJOY!!

Niki said...

Here's what I don't understand, why don't people adjust the recipe to suit themselves instead of complaining to you about the salt content.
If it's too salty use less salt, if it's too sweet use less sugar, if you're diabetic use a low calorie sweetener instead of sugar... I'm just saying it really is that simple.
I know people are easily offended but I'm not being rude, just realistic

Tracy said...

Niki - I hear ya. I think what happens is, people use the amount of salt I call for, which is a LOT (I LOVE SALT and I love to be able to really taste that salty within the sweet) but some people have a lower tolerance to salt than others. They make it with my proportions and find it to be inedible. That's why I added the suggestion to taste along the way. Since the eggs get added last, one can add salt until the eleventh hour and then add the eggs and bake. Part of the issue is that most cooks don't taste as they go in a sweet preparation. We're used to checking a sauce, but not a cheesecake. So if everyone tastes, we'll all have delicious cheesecake, which will probably lead to World Peace and Cure for the Common Cold. Who knew it was so simple? :)

Anonymous said...

I made this for Thanksgiving and it was the biggest hit! I love salt and caramel and this was perfect. I followed the instructions to the letter and it turned out perfectly. I'm going to make again next week for a Christmas party.

Tracy said...

Great--so glad to hear it was a hit!

Jo said...

Wanted to say I tried this cheesecake this weekend and it was a hit! I tasted as I went and halved the salt throughout the recipe and most people thought it was perfect -- I only had one person who said it could have used more salt. Thanks for sharing your fantastic recipe! This will definitely go into the rotation of desserts!

Tracy said...

That's great, Jo! So glad to hear it worked out for you. Cheers!

Jessica Ford said...

I made this last Christmas and it was such a hit! But a round cheese cake gets kind of messy, no one ever cuts it right and the knife gets messy and well when theres about 45 people serving themselves its just a lot. I was thinking I would make this in like a 9X13 dish- do you think that would work? Any suggestions on baking times for the crust and the cheese cake? Thanks again and great work on this one!! Its delish!!!

Tracy said...

Jessica, doing it in a 9X13 pan would radically change the cooking time of the filling, but I couldn't say by how much. The problem you'll face is that the filling in the center will still be undercooked, while that which is closer to the pan will be done. So if you really want to try this, I'd suggest you put the 9x13 pan in a water bath and allow several hours for it to get done, just to be on the safe side. But I don't know if it will work at all, so you might want to have a backup plan, just in case :) If you try it, let me know how it turns out, and how long it takes. I know what you mean about the mess of letting everyone serve themselves. I usually serve it for everyone, but of couse that's not practical if you're having a really big group. Good luck!

T

Tracy said...

P.S. the cooking time on the crust probably won't be that different, although you may need a lot more of it to cover a 9x13 pan. Just cook it until it gets slightly golden and you can smell it a little bit. It'll probably take about the same amount of time as a round.

Anonymous said...

I just realized I forgot the sugar =(
I can't believe I did that.... can this cake be saved?
(PS I cut salt down)

Tracy said...

No sugar? It MIGHT be edible--it just won't be super sweet. Dulce de Leche has sugar in it by defintion. But it won't be sweet sweet. Did you try it?

Leia Cunningham said...

Made this for Christmas dinner tonight. The taste was amazing!!! I did find it just a tad on the salty side, so even though I reduced the salt in the crust and in the filling I think I'll use even less. I also had a little bit of trouble getting the caramel topping to turn out, so it wasn't as dark, but it still tasted good. I think it has something to do with the altitude where I live. Anyway, thanks for a delicious recipe!

Tracy said...

Leia--so glad you enjoyed it. Yes, by all means adjust the salt to your taste. Caramel is tricky--it took me a long time to get the knack. Keep trying, it will come to you. Happy holidays!

Lauree K said...

Haven't tasted as a whole yet but so far the parts have tasted wonderful. I have the caramel on the stove now. I don't think I got it as dark as yours (it took over 20 min. to get it as dark as I did) but I have it on low and simmering away and it seems to be thickening up. It's still a nice color and very caramel tasting. I like the salt and never really considered myself a salt lover but I love the combination of salt with caramel. I am making it for my husband's boss, whose birthday is today. I think it may be going in missing a piece. :)

Lauree K said...

I did make the dulce de leche from a can of sweetened condensed milk. We live in the U.P. and there are lots of things you simply can't find around here.

Lauree K said...

So, my husband took this to work for his boss's birthday and called a few minutes later to tell me he dropped it on the floor in his office. :( I am currently in the process of trying again. It's just as well, once put together it was too much salt for my liking. I reduced to a tsp. in the crust, 2 tsp. in the cake and 1/2 tsp. in the caramel. Still plenty salty but I don't feel like I'm eating a saltlick anymore. :) My husband apparently tasted the first one and said he would have eaten it that way but could see how someone who's not a salt lover wouldn't have necessarily cared for it. Still a great recipe and one I'll be making often.

Tracy said...

Oh Lauree, so sorry to hear about the floor episode! It's a heavy cake, no doubt. I am a huge huge salt fan so I urge everyone to taste the components and make sure they do like the salt levels. "Salt lick" is certainly the opinion some have had if they're not huge salt-a-holics, so reduce as you need to so it's palatable for you. Good luck with version 2!

The Ortiz Family said...

Can't wait to make this cake with my 13 year old daughter who loves all things cheesecake. Thanks to whomever posted on pinterest and for posting again.

Marie said...

Loved this recipe. It was wonderful! Thanks for sharing. I ended up sharing it on my blog. It should be published shortly

Again thanks so much :)

Tracy said...

Glad you enjoyed it! Thanks for sharing!!

Kiva said...

I tried reading all the comments and am not sure I saw my particular issue addressed. LOVE the recipe and have so many requests to make it. I made it for my friend's birthday and she said it tasted perfect - fantastic even and no problems with salt, etc. I cut it back and use unsalted butter. BUT the center didn't set. I make cheesecakes all the time and have never had this problem before and wasn't sure how to fix it. So I made it again tonight and the center still did not look set and while I know testing it like cake does not work, the tester was very wet in the middle so I put it back in the oven, watching the middle. Cooked it an extra 20 minutes. It looked fine, then it totally cracked and collapsed but it tastes GREAT. How can I fix that issue?

Tracy said...

Hi Kiva, It sounds like your oven temp may be off. If you're cooking it for the right amount of time, it may be that the temperature of your oven isn't high enough, even though you may have set it to the "correct" temperature. It's a very deep cake, so it may take longer than a "shallower" one.

When you make things like cakes or muffins, it's easier to eyeball or check (with a skewer) the degree of doneness, but as you say, you can't do that with a cheesecake. I'd try checking your oven temperature, or if you don't have a thermometer, add an extra 20 minutes to the cooking time and see if that doesn't help. If it does, your oven temp may be low.

That's what I'd try. Glad it was a hit and hope you can get the doneness issue resolved!

Anonymous said...

This is a great recipe, but it still has too much salt. I even cut it and thought it was still too salty. I think the problem is that not every element needs to be salty for it to have the salted caramel taste.

I would go for a tsp in the crust, a tsp in the filling, a scant tsp for the caramel. That's the part you really want to have that salted caramel taste.

Also, if you can't find the dulce de leche (I know I have seen it before but couldn't find it anywhere when needed) just dump a can of sweetened condensed milk in a double boiler over medium-low heat and let it simmer until it gets gooey and tan - about 50-60 minutes. Stir it occasionally.

Lauree said...

I love this recipe (with my slightly less salt variation) and am in the process of making it for the fourth time since the beginning of summer. :)

Tracy said...

Dulce de leche can often be found in the Latin section of supermarkets. It is, as an earlier commenter noted, possible to make your own with a can of sweetened condensed milk if you can't find it. I'm glad people are enjoying this recipe!

Anonymous said...

I want to try this but half recipe... what size pan should i be using? also will the cooking time differ?

Tracy said...

My springform pan is about 9" across. That's about standard. If you use one that's much bigger (if you could find a 12" one? I'm not sure you can--they seem to be mostly 9-10")your cooking time would probably be a bit reduced--I'd start checking it at about 45 minutes. If it was much smaller--and therefore the filling was deeper, it would take longer to cook through. Hope that helps. Cheers!

Tracy said...

Sorry, I didn't read your comment carefully! A half recipe--you could still use the same size pan, just cook it for way less time--start checking at 20 minutes and keep checking every 5-7 minutes until it's done. I'm not sure where you'd get too much smaller a springform, but someone else may know where you could get a smaller one?

Erin said...

Can you make the caramel the night before? I love this cheesecake and am taking it to a work pot luck.

Tracy said...

Erin, I think you can (I confess I've never tried it), but you'll have to warm it up before you put it on the cake (you could do that in the microwave, very gently), then pour it over the cake. The only thing you'd have to do is refrigerate the cake with the caramel on it so that it would firm up before you served it. Let me know if that works out for you!

Maryleap said...

The comment said most amazing dessert, and that is what everyone said in my family who ate it. I am up now at 7 christmas morning making another one for christmas. A hint for a Dolce de Leche. , I made mine in the microwave with sweetened condensed milk, just make sure you do not keep the microwave on full power.

BEST CHEESECAKE RECIPE ever!

Tracy said...

So glad everyone in your family liked it! It's been requested as dessert on New Year's Eve in my house. Been awhile since I've made one, and I've been told it's been too long!

Cheers!

Anonymous said...

I first made this cheesecake 2 years ago for my husband's birthday party. It was a huge hit! It is now one of my go to recipes and I am making it again tomorrow for his birthday again. Thank you so much! It's a wonderfully delicious dessert!!!!

-Cassandra R.